Brush inking.

Lineart, pencils and inks and anything that makes a mark. Digital or traditional, no favourites here.
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pj
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Brush inking.

Post by pj »

I used to love brush inking. No tool like it when thinks are going well. But old age caught up and the brush fell out of favour, turning to dip pens (a bit more reliable with my old eyesight and dead mans grip) and brush pens (even less hassle!) but i know i should go back to brush.

So here’s stone advice i once got as a young lad (of about 30)

Clean your brush regularly.
Dip the brush and dry the ink off by rotating it to a point on some scrap paper then dip again.
Wash it frequently.
Keep it in a point by twirling it in your mouth (whens its washed)
And theres more but I've forgotten.

Any solid brush advice out there? (I used to hunt down online articles on it and print it out to keep)
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MikeyC99
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Re: Brush inking.

Post by MikeyC99 »

I we t through a heavy brush stage when I was working for TSR doing D&D illos (and a lot of wash) but for comics I can't make it work for me. The guy who I remain in awe of even after all these years is Mark Farmer he uses a brush with such precision you"d swear if was a nib.
Also the guy with the cleanest studio I have ever seen.
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pj
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Re: Brush inking.

Post by pj »

MikeyC99 wrote: Sat Jun 27, 2020 3:14 pm I we t through a heavy brush stage when I was working for TSR doing D&D illos (and a lot of wash) but for comics I can't make it work for me. The guy who I remain in awe of even after all these years is Mark Farmer he uses a brush with such precision you"d swear if was a nib.
Also the guy with the cleanest studio I have ever seen.
Clean studio ... ? Yikes. I'd love to have a clean studio, but it even when I *try* I find stuff on the ground, it's impossible.

Went and bought a bunch of brushes, I;ll have some thoughts later I'm sure. Largely they're all very simililair. One tip I picked up was about dealing with stray brush hairs (and this seems to work best on sable/natural) is to let it sit in some boiled water for a few minutes (start with 30 seconds and work your way up, til you're comfortable) and they'll just regain their shape!

If there's ink in the ferrel you've not much chance, but I find often with new brushes they've been so badly treated when I buy them that they might need a bit of tlc anyway.
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MikeyC99
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Re: Brush inking.

Post by MikeyC99 »

Brian Bolland used to terrify me when he showed me him inking using a Series#16 00 Sable. Of course, these days he gets to draw at single pixel size, so...
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Re: Brush inking.

Post by L.R.G.Carter »

I was thinking of trying a brush for the first time once I felt comfortable returning to non-essential shopping. I've previously always been a marker-pen person, so was wondering if there are any 'obvious with hindsight' style tips for avoiding rookie mistakes when making the transition?
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Re: Brush inking.

Post by pj »

get a few brushes, I tend to like "designer" brushes - these are brushes that used to be used by graphic designers (rather than. say, brushes designed by Gucci) I was recommended rigger brushes but couldnt get on with them. (A rigger brush is used for adding the rigging on a boat painting, long thing good for long straight lines)

The wrong brush will through you off. Everyone says Sable Series 7 but I couldnt never get comfy with those, and also: ink. Get a bottle of ink and something you feel comfortable pouring some ink in to - this will be your inking bottle, you can add ink or tap water (again, been advised distilled water, but tap water has always worked for me) to thin or thicken the ink. If you like ink that is nice and thick you can leave the lid off for a day or two. if it's too thick, you can add some water and mix it. Every so often you'll chuck that ink out and refill from the original ink bottle.
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L.R.G.Carter
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Re: Brush inking.

Post by L.R.G.Carter »

Decanting a session's ink into a smaller container! Even though I've done that with model paints since I was a kid, that would never have occurred to me, thanks!
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